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July 18, 2006

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Fatherflot

Thanks prof. I always look forward to your posts. Nobody else I know of understands and loves radio as a medium as much as you do. You even inspired me to buy my first (admittedly very cheap) shortwave set, the Grundig FR200 Emergency Radio. Got it as a floor model from a Radio Shack in Mentor Ohio for $29. I love using my own power to scan the airwaves, especially at night and I was amazed by how much is going on on the SW bands. Who knew this stuff was in the ether all around us.

Clark Williams

Thanks for writing this. I am a native Tennesseean generally inclined towards the past. I wanted to let you know that in Chattanooga there are two classic country stations, one AM and one FM. The AM station is quite good but difficult to pick up. The FM station's definition of "Classic Country" leans heavily on the late '70s and throughout the '80s, most of which music is delightfully awful. As well, there is a respectable "Oldies" station on the AM dial whose selection rotates about five years wide of 1970. It is truly a pleasure to hear this music on the AM band.

Despite this, however, I would imagine hardly a soul listens to these stations with genuine appreciation. The greater portion of the South seems to look with contempt upon the best of its history and culture.

CMac

"This migration brought a southern flavor to parts of lower Michigan. When I was younger, small towns like Ypsilanti and Walled Lake were jokingly referred to as Ypsi-tucky or Wall-tucky, in reference to the number of the twangy accents you might find there."

It's embarassing that you can't pull out a reference to the old WSDS 1480. How old are you really? That was in the 90's.

What is it now? - complete shit. That southern flavor is closer and closer to the equator.

Dale Hazelton

Nice post. I love a bit of personal history mixed in with my radio history. The sounds of PAMS jingles, hardware store ads, top 40 hits and sub-professional on-air talent makes for wonderful listening. Alan Weiner (WBCQ) phoned in his weekly show a couple of years ago remotely while on a lengthy road trip. One thing he said that I will always remember (paraphrased): "If you want to really get a sense of where you are, turn on your AM car radio."

I remember in the 60's as a kid in Western New York listening to "The Swop Shop" on WBUZam in Fredonia, folks calling in that they have an old lawn mower for sale for $5, or they were looking for a decent used dinette. BUZ closed a couple of decades ago as the cost of powering even a small transmitter got too expensive with few advertising dollars coming in, and people migrating to FM. While the Swop Shop can now only be picked up light years away in outer space, the drama of high-school sports and local politics, plus music from Perry Como, Steve and Edie, and the Mills Brothers still play on sister-city Dunkirk's WDOE 1410. Of course, they also broadcast the local police blotter, so you know which of your neighbors just got busted for DUI or posession.

Today in the Hudson Valley I have WTBQ 1110am out of Warwick NY (http://wtbq.com/station.asp) with such interesting local fodder as "Farm Talk", "The Herb Man", "Horse Talk" and the "Natalie Gubala Polka Fun Show". Most of these on-air "personalities" are just local people, not members of the Toastmaster's Club or communications majors, and that's part of the fun.

In the late 60's, early 70's, as soon as album-oriented rock reared it's head on FM, that was all I wanted to listen to. The local stuff just sounded, well, local, and that's not how I wanted to end up. Now I like my entertainment to connect me a bit to where I am, and who's around me. AM radio does that just fine.

Art(uro)

Thanks for the MP3s. I'm reminded on driving around rural southwestern Louisiana listening to some of the best AM radio i've ever heard. Cajun, zydeco, country and swamp pop all served up with a local, DIY feel.

John Hebert

I grew up in southwestern Louisiana (KJEF 1290 AM) and now live near New Orleans. My favorite radio memories are of listening with a single beige earplug, under the bedcovers as a small boy, and exploring the dial trying to find stations I had never heard before.

There are still plenty of small AM stations all over Louisiana that have playlists from years ago, as well as lots of great (and sometimes not so great, but sincere!) local bands.

Here's a good example that can be listened to over the Internet: http://www.radiolouisiane.com.

BTW, can anyone tell me if the Professor is also the Professor who created the SPOOKED broadcasts on the KPFA OTE show (http://www.nvo.com/cd/spooked/)?

ResidentClinton

It's Saturday, and I've been listening to these WCXI samples all morning. It is the best way to start a nice weekend morning, and those DJs are terribly endearing and earnest. Growing up in Denver, Colorado, this is the radio (am) that my grandfather would listen to as we drove around in his pick-up. But of course these stations are gone now even in the heart of the West (keep it coming, Texas). I want to take a trip to Michigan now just so I can drive around on a Friday night and listen to this station. Thanks so much for posting these!

Kevin martin

Hello,

My aunt was in Tim Doolittle and his Pine Center Gang's band. She was a singer and used to sing to us kids when we were young. we could not find any of her old recordings after she passed. If anyone has any or knows where I could find anything from this band please let me know via email. also please note this is a older band from the 20s 30s and 40s when it was still called country western.

BILL SOUTHORN

I REALLY LIKE THE STATION ESPECIALLY BRIAN BARNAM, JOHN MORRIS, AND JOHN PATALKA. I WAS UNDER THE UNDERSTANDING THAT THEY WERE GOING TO INCREASE THE POWER, BUT HAVE NOT AT THIS TIME. WHAT IS THE HOLD UP ON THIS? I CAN PICK THE STATION UP IN MY CAR REAL GOOD AND SOMETIMES IN THE HOUSE ON THE RADIO. I ALSO LIKED THE OTHER RADIO STATION THAT BIRACH OWNS THAT WAS CLASSIC COUNTRY BUT IS NOW ALL MEXICAN SPEAKING, AND MUSIC I LISTENED TO THAT STATION AT WORK BECAUSE I COULD NOT GET WCXI IN YPSI. PLEASE DO SOMETHING TO BOOST THE CLASSIC COUNTRY, AND BLUE GRASS MUSIC.

Ann M. Stuckey

Music Row Talent Reords, Inc. will have a release on Nat Stuckey in late August or early September, 2010. It contains a couple of songs he wrote and sang in the 1960's, 1970's and 1980's--all great country music. Do you remember SWEET THANG, DON'T YOU BELIEVE HER, WAITIN IN YOUR WELFARE LINE? These were all re-recorded by Nat prior to his death in 1988. I hope everyone will like them.

Brian Barnum

I'm the aforementioned Brian who had car trouble, so Sweet Sue
was sweet enough to fill that day. Most of my record collection
is still sitting in that studio, awaiting its reopening. I now
languish as a board operator at a public radio station, wishing
every day to be a classic country deejay once again.

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