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November 01, 2006

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Comments

Aaron

For more Americans goodness, take a listen to Crap from the Past's Bicentennial show with seven takes of this spoken word piece. Find it at http://www.archive.org/details/cftp-2001-07-02. Also, don't forget the DESIDERATA at http://www.archive.org/details/cftp-2002-06-24. This should keep you entertained.

David

Nice to have all the old favorites - and some new ones - in one place. Thanks, Ken!

Florida Occupant

Use of Music to stir the martial/patrios is as old as politics. You need a Sousa march on here. How 'bout the Stars and Stripes forever?

Tom

...or the "Internationale."

Vic Perry

Ken - how could you forget the chilling, scary-ass Clear Channel favorite "Silent Night 2001" (As I believe it was called) in which the Lord God Himself explains his views on the tragedy! This thing was on regularly when I worked in an office in Santa Fe, New Mexico, one of those "Office Space" sets where we all had enforced FM "entertainment." Every time this one came on it froze the blood in my streams.....the only thing worse was that they played Whitney's hideous super bowel rendition of the star spanking banner EVERY DAY at noon, had we not suffered enough?

Silent Night 2001 qualifies, definitely! The spookiness of "Ode to Billy Joe" mixed with the completely nutbar politics of "Open Letter To My Teenage Son."

Keep it Flying High!!!

Station Manager Ken

Thanks Vic - Silent Night 2001 sounds great, I need to track it down!

-ken

norelpref

Crankin', crankin.

John Lemmon

That's probably the high point of Johnny Sea's career. Johnny Sea specialized in sounds-like covers of Johnny Cash songs, a bargain record subgenre usually so disappointing that few bother to explore it anymore.

Your Pal Dave

My own personal favourite is '200 Years' on the Nashville soundtrack. I don't think you could really call that singing, it's closer to spoken word, so perhaps it qualifies?

Lukas

I don't know anything about Harry D. Cup, but I have a different version of "I'm a Sick American", by the Cathedral Quartet. Unfortunately, the MP3 is slightly screwed up, but I like it even better than Harry's. Otis Fodder once played it on his radio show.

Greg

Great post! Ever heard Forrest Tucker's hostage-era 45 "America, Stand Up"? Makes John Wayne's LP look soft.

C.S. Lewiston

Keith Olberman, now, there's a man with balls! We need more like him! Just thought you might like to know, he is an alumni of Cornell U.'s radio station WVBR.

TomBurgess

JINGOISM BETWEEN THE JINGLES
I too found that these awful recordings filled me with awe. The singles were purchased as political statements, but of course rarely played. Unfortunately that put them in the Top 40, so they ended up being played on air much more often than any owner could bear to hear. That then led to the creation of a hyper-unpatriotic public, indeed the deconversion of many patriotic purchasers who actually paid attention to radio embarassedly discovered the limitations of jingoism very quickly.
The real Sen. Everett Dirksen had an album out about the time of the Lundberg single -- now that's oratory!

Regarding Harry D. Cup, he was a Central Florida radio talk show host in the mid 70s (WGTO in Winter Haven and WDBO in Orlando) who would actually be considered one of the early "shock jocks". While his style was designed to be controversial, it was 100% shtick. Without question, ahead of his time, Harry was definitely entertaining.

Rick Sincere

You say that "Lundberg was briefly the spokesman of the American Libertarian Party in the Sixties." Either your identification of the party or your chronology is incorrect, because the Libertarian Party was not founded until 1971; it held its first convention and ran its first presidential ticket (John Hospers and Tonie Nathan) in 1972.

MIKE

I discovered some more info on Ludberg which might be od interest.

http://www.unpleasant.org/2005/12/03/victor-lundberg-an-open-letter/

SidFudd

And how could our countrymen forget Albert Brooks' immortal "A Phone Call to Americans" from 1975? By not remembering it, that's how. What about AMERICA'S kidneys! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=763E_TKLpGw&feature=relmfu

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