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December 04, 2006

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Nicholas

Sorta follows the obvious path of all media today: audience guided, controlled, and participated. Video games have become one of the most dominant forms of entertainment in the last decade, so it is safe to assume that purely passive entertainment (radio, television and film) will not be able to compete with anything that allows for interface. The future of radio, I think, will most likely either a) have a .com instead of an FM at the end, and be user guided (like Pandora) and b) have much more variety, as the big box companies try and garner as much attention as they can, even reaching out to niche groups. WFMU's place in this could be pretty cutting edge, since its business (is that the right phrase?) model allows for listener input on many levels. Also, the listener supported model gives me a sense of duty to listen and participate with the station, since I spent the money on it (along with thousands of others). While I don't know how an actual "profit" can be produced with the listener supported model, its important to remember that there was not much consensus on how to produce of profit on the internet (besides bilking investors). Trial and error has produced some working models, so I suppose the new wave of radio will have to do the same. Whatever comes though is going to be a welcome relief to having to listen to Bruce Springstein's "Born to Run" for the millionth time when driving my car, which would definitely bring some welcome soul back to my life.

Listener Dave

If the multimillion dollar profit Clear Channel made on buidling up and selling those stations was a "failure of a business model", I want to know how to design a failing business model too. Then I can retire.

Listener Mike D.

Dave,

You could go out there and try to emulate the Clear Channel model again, in 2006. Let us know how it goes...

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