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March 26, 2007

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Comments

b

Thanks a lot for posting this - it's f*&%in' great!
Never heard of this LP before, must be a super-rarity.

Any chance of posting the complete artwork? I'd love to have this as a CD-R with a nice looking cover.

Cheers,
-b

Jeff G

The bass player for the Nightwatch, Bruce Conforth, was the first curator of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He teaches at U Michigan, apparently a class called "Beatniks, Hippies and Punks." There's an uproarious thread here where a bunch of his students try to figure out which band he was in back in the sixties. Guesses include the Grateful Dead and the Fugs. So far nobody's guessed The Nightwatch, though. And somebody says, 'you should get him to tell you his wfmu story...because it is the most hilarious ever.'

whoops

Thanks for this real nice sixties artifact, i really appreciate. One question, why does this supposed 12 track sampler only get 10 downloadable tracks ? Were the two remaining cuts too scratched to be ripped ?

hoppystone

I didn't post the other two cuts because one was head and shoulders better than the others (the band is actually pretty good, and the recording and overall presentation much better; actually sounds like a record that could have been released then), and the second, I thought, was really just drivel.
However, I now realize that maybe for the sake of completeness, it should all have been done at once. Plus, frankly I didn't know it would get this type of positive response!
I certainly don't want to deprive anyone of their jollies, so in time I'll eventually get the other two cuts up to Otis and maybe we'll have an 'IHH pt. II'. How's that?
I only wish there were outtakes...

Scott Mercer

I could have told you this would get a positive response. There's a whole subgenre out there of the "local battle of the bands" garage rock LP that is collected and traded in the Sixties Garage Rock/Psychedelic/Hippie/Blooze Rock vinyl collecting community. I realize this is not a "Battle of the Bands" in the formal sense, as there is no competition, but I have come across several reissues of this type of local band compilation LP in my collecting travels. Twist-O-Rama, on Norton Records is one, (tied in with a local Utica, New York TV show) and there was a Battle of the Bands LP from Baltimore that also got exhumed by somebody. Forget the name. There were also a number of this type of LP in the Surf Rock genre, mostly from California or Hawaii. Great stuff.

Susan Neale

Where did you find this? I thought my mother had the last 2-3 existing copies. Bill Neale was my dad. He was a high school theater teacher in the '60s who moonlighted as a radio announcer and theater lighting director. He and my mom, Gay Neale, threw fantastic parties for the students (I grew up with fond memories of a drum set in the livingroom--none of us played drums) and did much to support them in all of their crazy dreams. He died in a motorcycle wreck in front of our house in 1967 (I was 4, my brother 8) but the students stayed in our lives, even after we moved to Va. and many are still in touch. Those students were mainly the "artists" on this album. My dad probably knew little about recording an album, but a lot about inspiring and helping people. he was a truly gifted and loved teacher, and I've tried to follow in his footsteps, as have many of "the kids"--and if you google them, you'll find many have musical and other artistic types of careers. (Dr. Wayne Kirby teaches music at UNC Asheville, fo instance). Thanks for bringing this relic back to life!

Bruce Conforth

A few corrections... Harris was not a founding member of The Wind in the Willows as is clearly evident on their one LP. Harris joined the band shortly after the album. Harris was "the" singer at that place and that time. He had the lead role in his senior play "The Music Man" as Prof. Harold Hill. This was in 1967 and The Mothers of Invention were one of our favorite bands. In one of their songs is the line "Who could imagine..." (which is followed by a number of observations like 'who could imagine that they would freak out in kansas city?)and at the finale of The Music Man Harris was to lead the ensemble in a big parade off stage and out of the auditorium. My "date" and I were sitting in the front row and (you have to get the whole image here) as the band was playing 76 Trombones and the whole cast is getting into this parade Harris highsteps up to us, pauses, and sings "Who could imagine?" That was the kind of slightly insane humor that pervaded the Neale "crowd" and held us together as a group. Still holds many of us together as has been already stated.
(And, in a personal note, I teach full time at UM... American Subcultural Groups - the aforementioned Beats, Hippies, and Punks - is only one of many courses that I teach - albeit the most popular one).
The main group that has been mentioned as "seminal" - Harris, Wayne, Roy, Bob, Nancy, myself, and later adding Frank, Pete, Ron - really were a family. That was a great time.

Bada Bing Crosby

Anybody know which parts of New Jersey these great bands were from??

John Kardell

It' a very long story, but I learned about all of this just this evening! I'm happy to hear that many of the people I knew many,many years ago are still around and doing well.I think the review of "Patterns of Emptiness" was right on the money,dead on... yes we knew, but we were't allowed to do another take.Actually,we warmed up with "Around & Around" (which I recall was excellent,everybody was dancing),and did "Patterns of Emptiness" in one take...should have rehearsed that one once! Oh well,too late. For those of you who may remember, I did get rid of the Gretsch(grounded with masking tape!!) and continued playing for a while in the Seventies... best memory... backing Bo Diddley with the group I was in at the time (he used house bands).Anyway,thanks for the trip on the Wayback Machine. I wish you all the very best. Please let me know if there will be a "Geezers Happening Now", I would like to be there!

Bruce Conforth

Bada Bing Crosby:

Everyone was from Passaic County, New Jersey

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