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June 13, 2009

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Comments

Richard

Looks delicious :)
Yu shouldn't worry too much about deadlines or success or any of it; the important thing, surely, is to keep it fun.
Isn't that why we all start gardening?

Elias

Amazingly enough, most plants do fine with little care from us, in the beginning the hardest part was to keep myself from overdoing stuff expecting plants to show speedy results. It's not a competition, you don't have to prove anything to anyone and it's impossible to not have plants die on you no matter how experienced you may be.

Too bad you 're in the UK and can't try some tropical wonders out in the open. Seeds are cheap on ebay but as high temperatures + plenty of sun are necessary for growth it's hard for them to bear fruit even in a greenhouse.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1rfXde7Up0

trouble

gg girlie, be cool honey child. you can do it! the earth can do it, or not, but your job is just to analyze, assess and soldier on...

Anne

This is my first year with a large garden, and to call it an out of control science experiment is so correct! I now I have lettuce going to seed (but hopefully I can collect and save some), and potatoes that are three feet tall. But to see the transformation from when I started is incredibly satisfying. I worry that this or that vegetable won't work out, but that's all right, because that's how we learn.

And isn't it great when you have something you can actually eat? That there is proof that you've been successful!

Cheers!

Dale

Even with chicken wire down to the ground I figured I was spending a couple of hundred dollars a year to feed the rabbits, woodchucks and neighborhood deer. Then a new septic system installation obliterated all the amendments I had added to my soil, so the last couple of years I just hit the local greenmarkets. I got the itch again this year and went the drywall bucket method for my tomatoes and peppers, with greens growing in an old wheelbarrow I picked up in the trash. At least the rabbits can't junp three feet up. Or can they?

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