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September 25, 2010

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Comments

K.

Boy, I thought I'd tried just about everything on my LPs, but this is a new one for me. Back in the day, some company sold a silicon based product that did this same thing. I don't see how the wood glue would be any different though. Thanks for sharing.

DJ ManRich

I've heard of that trick before, but also have never tried it.
I've only had or found a few LPs and 45s that have needed that kind of treatment.
My equipment situation has also been less-than-ideal, so I can't judge sounds in a realistic, before and after scenario. I also suspect that some LPs and mainly 45's on budget labels simply have poor pressings. I have a few priceless religious weirdo records that - while relatively pristine - have such poor sound that it sounds like dirt or needle wear and even one that's mastered poorly so that the audio waveform appears brickwalled and distorted, even though it's ripped below 0db.
I only mention all of this as I used to suspect that the culprit was dirt (mildew, etc) and after cleaning, was disappointed with the results.

craig

some records will always sound like crap because they are made of crap - many budget (and some big-time) pressing plants would buy up old records, boil them
in a vat to (mostly) remove the labels, and then grind them all up and feed it into the presses. so if you ever get a record with what looks
like a piece of paper in it, it is!

Ken the Talented Artist Showcase guy

A good bit of the old useless information.

The original "Magic Lantern Slide Projector" was invented in 1676 and was called the Sturm Lantern.

It progressed through the 1800's and was used as an apparatus for displaying photographic images.

Lantern slides lasted into early 1900's and in 1950 was replaced by the Kodachrome three-color process made 35mm slides less expensive to produce than lantern slides.

taobao

Never too old to learn.*

Vincent Cassel

My equipment situation has also been less-than-ideal, so I can't judge sounds in a realistic, before and after scenario. I also suspect that some LPs and mainly 45's on budget labels simply have poor pressings. I have a few priceless religious weirdo records that - while relatively pristine - have such poor sound that it sounds like dirt or needle wear and even one that's mastered poorly so that the audio waveform appears brickwalled and distorted, even though it's ripped below 0db.

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