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February 21, 2011

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KingofthePaupers

"Just look up “alternative currency” and you’ll find a lot of them, all perfectly legal—except, ha ha, the Ron Paul dollar, which was backed with actual precious metals and so the FBI raided the issuers’ office and everyone got indicted and now there has to be trial."
Jct: Ithaca Hours, Berkshire Berkshares, Pittsboro Plentys are all legal but the morons at Liberty Dollar made the Ron Paul Dollar look like real money which is the crime. I think that unnecessary offence was meant to give community dollars an air of illegality. It can work like real money as long as it does not look like real money,

"Thunk Tank is issuing Thunk Tank Notes.. Federal Reserve notes for Thunk Tank notes 1:1. We intend to make the Bieb the second-most popular currency among WFMU Listeners, and we figure as long as we don’t issue coinage or claim to be legal tender, we probably won’t get indicted.
Jct: Yes, right. But why do a weak sister community currency. Why not do both the Berkshares cash-buy-in poker chips and use the Ithaca Hours timebank poker chips. In 1999, under the UNILETS Time Standard of Money, I paid for 39/40 nights in Europe with a timebank IOU for a night back in Canada worth 5 Hours which I recorded on my public do-it-yourself timebank account: http://johnturmel.com/unilets.htm Your thunk timedollars could be spent at timebanks around the world too as long as you're willing to put foreigners up in your town too!

rahrahrahrah

PEET ZAH?

Harry

the United States Code provides that Federal Reserve notes “shall be redeemed in lawful money on demand at the Treasury Department of the United States, in the city of Washington, District of Columbia, or at any Federal Reserve bank”—but what is “lawful money”? Well, in this case, it’s debt.

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